GLASS Review – Fragile Story Holds Together, But Just Barely

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Staci Layne Wilson’s Glass review says it combines elements from Unbreakable (2000) and Split (2016), then weaves them into something wicked, new and intriguing.

Glass reviewWriter-director M. Night Shyamalan has crafted an intriguing if somewhat convoluted tale in Glass, which can best be described as a dark superhero thriller. It combines characters and elements from Unbreakable (2000) and Split (2016), then weaves them into an intriguing look at inner worlds of three men with less-than-lovely superpowers. In case you’re wondering: Glass is one of those mythology-steeped stories that has several concurrently-running subplots, so yes, it does help if you’ve seen the previous two films in the trilogy.

From Unbreakable David Dunn (Bruce Willis) and Elijah Price (Samuel L. Jackson) remain in contrast, as one is oddly indestructible while the other is painfully fragile.

From Split, we get reacquainted with Kevin Wendell Crumb (James McAvoy), a recluse with dissociative identity disorder. He contains personalities that are at once strong and weak, which imbues him with an uncanny understanding of what makes David and Elijah tick.

When the trio lands inside the padded cells of an imposing psychiatric hospital, they come under the care of Dr. Ellie Staple (Sarah Paulson). Staple specializes in a specific type of delusion of grandeur: people who believe they are comic-book characters. But are these men delusional or are they actually beyond the realm of the human condition?

The cast is brilliant, with McAvoy standing out thanks to his showy role as “The Horde.” Other returnees from the previous aforementioned movies include Spencer Treat Clark as Dunn’s son and Charlayne Woodard  as Price’s mother, plus Anya Taylor-Joy as Casey Cooke, the only captive to survive Crumb’s insane form of love.

Glass is sort of like a vase that’s been broken then glued back together – it still holds water, but you can see the cracks. In spite of the moments of confusion and long, drawn-out dialogue sequences, the film is undeniably Shyamalan. His hardcore fanbase will love it. And yes: there’s a twist.

Did this review of Glass intrigue you? Look for showtimes and theaters at Fandango.com

Rated PG-13
2 Hours 12 Minutes

Staci Layne Wilson’s Glass review says it combines elements from Unbreakable (2000) and Split (2016), then weaves them into something wicked, new and intriguing.

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Staci Layne Wilson

Staci Layne Wilson is an accomplished writer / director / producer / film critic and the author the bestseller So L.A. - A Hollywood Memoir. Find her on StaciLayneWilson.com

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